The Artful Insomniac

seanhowe:

Gawker headlines: pushing the limits of false equivalence.

seanhowe:

Gawker headlines: pushing the limits of false equivalence.

skunkbear:

nprontheroad:

In late July and August, something remarkable happens in the air above Lake Murray, South Carolina.  For the past 25 years, half a million purple martins (large swallows) have gathered on a small island in the hundreds of thousands.  This year, they didn’t show up.

This weekend Skunk Bear goes mobile! I’m down in South Carolina RIGHT NOW looking for the missing birds, and I’ll be chronicling the search over at NPR’s travelogue blog - nprontheroad.tumblr.com. You can read all about the mystery of the purple martins and the humans who love them over there.

skunkbear:

nprontheroad:

In late July and August, something remarkable happens in the air above Lake Murray, South Carolina.  For the past 25 years, half a million purple martins (large swallows) have gathered on a small island in the hundreds of thousands.  This year, they didn’t show up.

This weekend Skunk Bear goes mobile! I’m down in South Carolina RIGHT NOW looking for the missing birds, and I’ll be chronicling the search over at NPR’s travelogue blog - nprontheroad.tumblr.com. You can read all about the mystery of the purple martins and the humans who love them over there.

seanhowe:

Chris Claremont Documentary(Photo: Paul Smith and Chris Claremont, circa 1983.)

X-Men: Days of Future Past, which would not exist without Claremont, opens on Friday. In the meantime, here’s a 41-minute documentary on Claremont’s X-Men, with exclusive interviews with Claremont, Jim Shooter, Louise Simonson, Len Wein, Annie Nocenti, Peter Sanderson, and, uh, me.

(via hodgman)

seanhowe:

Please consider reblogging this one.
The historically priceless files of the Comics Magazine Association of America—the decades-spanning industry organization that, among other things, instituted the Comics Code, are (still) missing.
Back in early 2011, I wrote a letter to Heidi MacDonald of The Beat, asking for her help in getting the word out.

Unfortunately, as the Comic Magazine Association of America quietly dissolves, it also carries its own history down the drain. Last year, in the course of researching a book, I tried without success to locate the files of the CMAA, which had been maintained since 1948 and were accessible as of the 1990s. Representatives at DC, Archie, and Marvel were unable to answer my questions about where the files might have ended up, although I did receive a response from a former CMAA representative. In regard to my question of who might now be safeguarding the documents, she wrote, “There really is no one. Legally, none of the old documents of the organization had to be kept. Much of it was kept in Michael Silberkleit’s office up in Archie, but as you now know, sadly, he passed on. Not sure what they would have done with the old files.”
The records of Josette Frank and the Child Study Association of America—which had challenged the comic-book scare of the late 1940—had been donated to the CMAA years ago. Now they have vanished, along with detailed notes on industry-wide meetings throughout the 1950s, 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s among Jack Liebowitz, Stan Lee, Carmine Infantino, John Goldwater, and others.
It seems very possible that these traces of history will soon (if they haven’t already) wind up in the dumpsters of Time Warner or Disney. The industry’s lack of interest in its own heritage is distressing. Do you suppose anything can be done?

Heidi immediately posted to her site about the mystery of the missing files, but no one in the industry ever came forward with any information. As I’ve been sifting through the documents I accumulated during research for the book, I was reminded again of how important the preservation of these kinds of files are. So, if you’re reading this, and you work at Archie, DC, or Marvel, would you mind maybe asking around the office? Hopefully the files haven’t been trashed yet.

seanhowe:

Please consider reblogging this one.

The historically priceless files of the Comics Magazine Association of America—the decades-spanning industry organization that, among other things, instituted the Comics Code, are (still) missing.

Back in early 2011, I wrote a letter to Heidi MacDonald of The Beat, asking for her help in getting the word out.

Unfortunately, as the Comic Magazine Association of America quietly dissolves, it also carries its own history down the drain. Last year, in the course of researching a book, I tried without success to locate the files of the CMAA, which had been maintained since 1948 and were accessible as of the 1990s. Representatives at DC, Archie, and Marvel were unable to answer my questions about where the files might have ended up, although I did receive a response from a former CMAA representative. In regard to my question of who might now be safeguarding the documents, she wrote,
“There really is no one. Legally, none of the old documents of the organization had to be kept. Much of it was kept in Michael Silberkleit’s office up in Archie, but as you now know, sadly, he passed on. Not sure what they would have done with the old files.”

The records of Josette Frank and the Child Study Association of America—which had challenged the comic-book scare of the late 1940—had been donated to the CMAA years ago. Now they have vanished, along with detailed notes on industry-wide meetings throughout the 1950s, 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s among Jack Liebowitz, Stan Lee, Carmine Infantino, John Goldwater, and others.

It seems very possible that these traces of history will soon (if they haven’t already) wind up in the dumpsters of Time Warner or Disney. The industry’s lack of interest in its own heritage is distressing. Do you suppose anything can be done?

Heidi immediately posted to her site about the mystery of the missing files, but no one in the industry ever came forward with any information. As I’ve been sifting through the documents I accumulated during research for the book, I was reminded again of how important the preservation of these kinds of files are. So, if you’re reading this, and you work at Archie, DC, or Marvel, would you mind maybe asking around the office? Hopefully the files haven’t been trashed yet.

jamesurbaniak:

Me and Hal Hartley in 1997 on the set of “Henry Fool.” In 2006 I reprised my role as Simon Grim in the sequel “Fay Grim.” Now Hal is Kickstartering “Ned Rifle,” the third movie in what he always conceived as a trilogy.
Hal’s a true artist, a personal filmmaker with a real vision. He’s always had to work to raise money. He’s working hard at it now. If you’ve enjoyed “Henry Fool” or any of his films, I urge you to help make this one happen.  You can also help just by reposting this. I’m looking forward to putting that jacket back on.

jamesurbaniak:

Me and Hal Hartley in 1997 on the set of “Henry Fool.” In 2006 I reprised my role as Simon Grim in the sequel “Fay Grim.” Now Hal is Kickstartering “Ned Rifle,” the third movie in what he always conceived as a trilogy.

Hal’s a true artist, a personal filmmaker with a real vision. He’s always had to work to raise money. He’s working hard at it now. If you’ve enjoyed “Henry Fool” or any of his films, I urge you to help make this one happen. You can also help just by reposting this. I’m looking forward to putting that jacket back on.

hodgman:

And now THIS is happening? Thanks a lot, Obamacare. 

hodgman:

And now THIS is happening? Thanks a lot, Obamacare. 

paulscheer:

BACK TO THE FUTURE
30 YEARS - REAL vs MAKE-UP 

paulscheer:

BACK TO THE FUTURE

30 YEARS - REAL vs MAKE-UP 

npr:

Our nearest star is about to pull a once-in-11-years move by swapping its north and south magnetic poles.

The sun’s polarity switch is a natural part of “solar max” — the period of peak activity during what averages out to be roughly an 11-year cycle. According to NASA, this year will mark the fourth time since 1976 that scientists have observed the 180-degree pole flip.

"It looks like we’re no more than 3 to 4 months away from a complete field reversal," solar physicist Todd Hoeksema of Stanford University says on NASA’s website. “This change will have ripple effects throughout the solar system.”

Read the rest on NPR’s The Two-Way blog.